#150 Fast for a Day

The postulation is that without food to digest, the body organically spends its energy cleaning house.

Sharing 365 life lessons, tips, or hacks; the things that make life easier, happier, and more productive. I hope you’ll follow along and find them helpful too.

#150

Fast for a Day

You may have done this recently for some kind of a medical test and decided that fasting was ‘for the birds’ as you denied yourself coffee or food because the doctor ‘said so’.

Personal Control

What if you fasted for a day because YOU wanted to… because you were demonstrating control over your body for the purpose of telling your cells ‘who’s boss’! Or, perhaps you’ve heard of “intermittent fasting” where you only eat food during an 8 hour time period and no more – giving your body a full 16 hours every day to process what you’ve put in it.

Perfect Design

Fasting has been a tradition, a happenstance of the environment, a spiritual practice, and a medicinal effort for perhaps as long as man has been walking the earth. At the very least, our bodies are designed to fast overnight as we sleep and they know what to do when they are deprived. In fact, many illnesses were called “Kings disease” because it was only those who were well fed that came down with particular ailments – attributed to gluttonous living.

Start Over

While there are significant debates among medical professionals about the types of illness that benefit from fasting, one tenet is common; fasting offers the body an opportunity to ‘reset’ (akin to ‘wiping the hard drive’). This may be especially helpful when beginning a healthier eating phase or starting a weight loss program – a kind of ‘jump start’ for your body by cleansing the system of accumulated toxins.

Fasting – consuming water only – for a day allows the body an opportunity to enter the stage of autophagy which basically means that the body naturally works to repair damage that has accumulated. The postulation is that without food to digest, the body organically spends its energy cleaning house. Intermittent fasting (one day a week, for example) has been demonstrated to be very helpful for some medical conditions.

Be Smart

Some people fast for longer durations. These intense fasting sessions should be done under medical supervision as the experience is very similar to detoxing from hard core drugs according to people who have suddenly eliminated sugars and refined carbs from their diets. When the body is denied these ‘drugs’ and the reserves it has to use run dry – there is a withdrawal experience.

Before you grab the bull by the horn and dive into a fasting experience, pick a day when you will be distracted by things or people you love (to detract your attention away from hunger), do a trial run by…

Fasting for a day.

I love hearing your thoughts and ideas. Please share in the comments below

#354 of 365 Ways to live Easier, Happier, & More Productive

Crying may solicit attention from others, rallying our support system and generating a sense of belonging. Our bodies naturally release oxytocin and endorphins in emotional tears; chemicals found to relieve physical pain. Those same chemicals are known to promote better moods so the simple act of crying may indeed, lighten our mood.

My goal is to share a daily life lesson, tip, or hack. They are the things I want my children to know and the things that I teach to clients. They are the things that make my life easier, happier, and more productive. I hope you’ll follow along and find them helpful too.

#354

Cry it out

On the long running television show Grey’s Anatomy, the lead character Merideth has been known to “dance it out” with friends when full of intense emotion. That’s great strategy but it’s mostly great for fictional television.

Sometimes, in real life, we just have to let the tears fall. We were born knowing how to emote. Babies laugh and cry when they have something to express and somewhere along the line we are told to suck it up, dry up the tears, and pull up the boot straps. We are taught to repress something natural and innate. I am not suggesting that we have a meltdown in the middle of a supermarket but taking the time to cry if we are sad, deeply disappointed, or full of other emotion in an appropriate environment can be a game changer.

Crying has its benefits. In fact, it is postulated that crying activates the parasympathetic nervous system which stimulates a relaxation effect. Crying may solicit attention from others, rallying our support system and generating a sense of belonging. Our bodies naturally release oxytocin and endorphins in emotional tears; chemicals found to relieve physical pain. Those same chemicals are known to promote better moods so the simple act of crying may indeed, lighten our mood.

Most of us who have had ‘a good cry’ with solid sobs would probably attest that even though it was exhausting, we felt better afterward. The energy (emotion is energy) that we feel when we are tempted to cry is best released. If we don’t ‘cry it out’… the energy remains in our system and may be redirected via anger, passive aggression, or a related negative expression. Perhaps worse, is the theory that proposes unexpressed emotions contribute to other major health concerns such as depression, anxiety, and even cancers.

It takes courage and strength to move against the cultural norm; to develop a productive coping mechanism; and to face down feelings. Allowing yourself to cry is an act of bravery. And keep in mind that tears don’t have to be public to be productive so the next time you fill with emotion and get the urge to release it, remember to…

Cry it out.

I love hearing your thoughts and ideas. Please share in the comments below.