#95 Read the Bible

Additionally, because of its contribution to the culture at large, it helps us to comprehend embedded nuances. The bible is filled with lots of practicality about life.  

Sharing 365 life lessons, tips, or hacks; the things that make life easier, happier, and more productive. I hope you’ll follow along and find them helpful too.

#95

Read the Bible

If you are a Christian, you’ve probably already done this. If not, scholars around the globe have spoken about the rich value of the bible as literature and it may be a book you want to read. It is rich in history and parables. It is full of life advice and insight about the human condition.

For No Other Reason

Perhaps for no other reason, the objective of reading the bible is to understand the call and drive of the Christian community; a significant percentage of the world. Additionally, because of its contribution to the culture at large, it helps us to comprehend embedded nuances. The bible is filled with lots of practicality about life.  For example:

In the New Testament, James writes… “my dear brothers and sisters, take note of this: Everyone should be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry.

At the end of the day, that’s just good advice – believer or not.

Sacred Text

The bible is the world’s most recognized sacred text. It’s a historical document. If you remove any emotion one may feel about it’s ‘religious’ attachment – there is great value in seeing it as a great antique; responsible for much of the governing history across time. It may help in understanding the development of other cultures. It is the foundation of Western Art.

Christians

Of course, if you are a Christian – then you may see the bible as a literal interpretation of the Word of God and for that reason, the bible is a textbook for living life as a Christian. Years ago, someone recommended that we may find value in reading the bible ourselves – from cover to cover and then… attend a bible study group to dive more deeply into various chapters and stories.

If you are seeking a new book – a historical account that covers thousands of years and proves to be a sociological overview of cultural development and idiosyncrasies, then there is only one option…

Read the Bible.

I love hearing your thoughts and ideas. Please share in the comments below.

#148 Read a book about History

The older you get, the more you realize that humans don’t change that dramatically from generation to generation – at least not from those things that make us human – behavior and intention.

Sharing 365 life lessons, tips, or hacks; the things that make life easier, happier, and more productive. I hope you’ll follow along and find them helpful too.

#148

Read a book about History

Was History a class that you zoned out on in High School or College? Did you resist listening to the story about Christopher Columbus or Napoleon for the umpteenth time after awhile? Have you ever found yourself wishing you knew more about certain time periods now that you are an adult and perhaps more traveled?

Fiction or Non?

Learning about history can be accomplished in a variety of ways but reading a book that is either biographical in nature, a factual presentation of historical data, or a historical novel can offer a great perspective and tons of information you never knew you’d actually find interesting.

Outside of reading about Mary Todd Lincoln and fantasizing about being able to wear hoop skirts, my interest in historical information was minimal until I became an adult. Interestingly, it was my love of historical fiction and generational novels that enticed a wider interest in other time periods and I’m not sure I gave it much significance until Downton Abbey rekindled my interest in the fashions of the late 1800’s – shortly after hoops were removed from the skirts of ladies dresses.

Emotional Investment

Since then, and perhaps in tandem with a couple of visits to Europe in recent years, my interest in history has bloomed. I’ve enjoyed the fiction of Ken Follett and Edward Rutherford – both authors who create magical fictional characters against the backdrop of actual events. I am able to imagine the depth and breadth of those moments far better than a college history lecture when I am emotionally invested in the characters who are being invaded by the Nords, grieving a war loss, or losing their fortune in a market crash.

Biographies

Biographies are another way to establish an emotional connection to a character; one who is historical in their own right. These books are stories as well as factual (in most cases) accounts that are shared in the context of the person’s life – mostly historical. The need for environmental context is almost always present and so we are introduced to this person in relation to their historical surroundings, often giving us a front seat view of an event we read out in the paper or in a textbook at some point.

Politics

Maybe even more recently, I am intrigued by political history and as they say, “history repeats itself” (I know this to be true with firsthand experience in fashion and furniture design) so I search archived accounts of leaders who demonstrated attributes similar to our current president. I think I am looking for hope.

Perspective

History gives us perspective. The older you get, the more you realize that humans don’t change that dramatically from generation to generation – at least not from those things that make us human – behavior and intention. We may do different things but our motivation is often similar – allowing us to experience compassion and empathy when we look backwards. It can also promote deep gratitude; for the people who came before us – their struggle, efforts, and intent.

We can always be learning and growing. One of the ways to do that is to…

Read a book about history.

I love hearing your thoughts and ideas. Please share in the comments below

#159 Have Your Palm Read

Supposedly, this ancient method of predicting has some merit. Recent science has correlated greater athletic talent in men whose ring finger is longer than his index finger.

Sharing 365 life lessons, tips, or hacks; the things that make life easier, happier, and more productive. I hope you’ll follow along and find them helpful too.

#159

Have your palm read

Even if you don’t believe in someone’s ability to ‘see’ into your hand; because … you there is NO way to definitively know for sure! So… just in case there IS something to it… find a palm reader with good reviews and take the plunge – it’s fun!

Palmistry has been practiced for thousands of years and some individuals are very talented in their ability to describe the characteristics about your life and personality based on the composition of your hand. First they look that the fingers and there are assumptions made depending on

The length of your various fingers

The space between your fingers

The thinness of your fingers

The shape of your fingernail

The state of your fingernail

Additionally, the lines in your palm represent a variety of areas; marriage, head, heart, fate, sun, children, money, and health. More information is contributed based on moles, the way lines cross, and shapes that they make. Even the size of your hand matters. The left hand speaks your potential, the right hand about what you’ve done with that potential.

Supposedly, this ancient method of predicting has some merit. Recent science has correlated greater athletic talent in men whose ring finger is longer than his index finger. (I’m so curious to know how many of you just looked at your fingers!). Those men are more apt to be well-endowed and have more children. Those with longer index fingers are more prone to heart disease. Scientists think these elements have something to do with the prenatal testosterone exposure. Go figure!

These ‘palm readers’ are versed in the thousands of years of similarities and perhaps even the results of modern research so they notice and comment on those things that are common across individuals with similar characteristics. They may tell you something that you don’t know… not that it is ‘carved in stone’ but that you may be more prone to something that is indicated across the population with similar individuals.

Having your palm read is just a fun… not too serious activity that you can do with friends, sisters, bridesmaids, a partner, or colleagues. It’s harmless unless you make more of it than is intended. Take it with a grain of salt… kind of like… Blondes have more fun. For some it’s true – for others, not so much.

The next time you want something fun and crazy to do, consider…

Having your palm read.

I love hearing your thoughts and ideas. Please share in the comments below

#273 of 365 Ways to live Easier, Happier, & More Productive

My children are always intrigued about my childhood and how I spent time before video games and electronics. They find it interesting to imagine…

Sharing a daily life lesson, tip, or hack; the things that make life easier, happier, and more productive. I hope you’ll follow along and find them helpful too.

#273

Write down a favorite childhood memory.

Close your eyes for a minute and allow yourself to go back in time – back to when you were a child. Allow yourself to remember a moment of laughter, of comfort, or fun. What was happening then? Who was there? What were you thinking and feeling? What about that particular memory stands out?

Go ahead and write down the details – the answer to the above questions – for this memory and then do it again, and again.

Take the time to cherish, even savor, each of those memories as you write them. The act of writing will refresh your memory even more (perhaps stimulating additional details). Remembering pleasant times stimulates those pleasure areas in our brain and while they don’t spur the same level of chemicals that the actual even does, there is some dopamine production with the remembering.

Writing down the fun times helps to honor the experiences so that they balance our perspectives more evenly. Our brains are still wired to be noticing everything that is wrong (survival instinct) and so when we take time to reflect on the positives, we appreciate the true balance that typically exists in our overall existence.

If nothing else, writing down these memories captures them for our later reflection or maybe even more importantly, for the people who love us. My children are always intrigued about my childhood and how I spent time before video games and electronics. They find it interesting to imagine how we lived in a time that they’ve only read about or seen represented on television. The world is continuing to change, so capturing this little slice of history may be impactful to all of our future generations. How fun for all when we sit around and remember that time when Granny…

Write down a favorite childhood memory (or two).

I love hearing your thoughts and ideas. Please share in the comments below.

Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash